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Did you know?

We like to think we're a pretty interesting place to work. So we've put together 10(ish) things you never knew you never knew about ITV to prove it. Feast your eyes below.

Street cred

ITV is home to Britain's longest-running soap. Coronation Street has been on our screens since the 9th December 1960.

In 2010 Corrie celebrated its 50th birthday with a live episode - we did the same for our 40th anniversary too, where the special guest was none other than HRH Prince Charles.

1

We don't want
to make a song
and dance
about it, but...

Throughout the course of five series of Dancing On Ice, we've given almost 1,000 individual spray tans - using 1,500 canisters of fake tan in the process. And in season six alone, our glam squad used about 250 pairs of fake eyelashes. No, really.

Looking good doesn't stop there though. Each of our celeb's stunning costumes is hand made - and every single crystal is stuck on individually. It's a lot of work - especially when you consider that a typical dress used 5,500 - 6,000 of them!

2

Know our history

Our 56-year history includes a number of firsts. We were the first independent TV service and we brought Britain its first ever female newsreader.

We also broadcast the first Election debate, and with the UK's first ever product placement deal under our belt, it's a history of ground-breaking achievements that we're adding to every year.

3

It's a numbers game

When you add up all the security staff, runners, producers, catering staff and editors, we have about 500 members of crew in the jungle every year.

But that's nothing compared to the amount of creepy crawlies we use - in just one season the show featured 200,000 cockroaches, 65,000 crickets, 2.5 million meal worms, 250 spiders and 500 rats. Oh, and six metre-long crocodiles.

4

We are
what
we eat

Which is why our canteens offer food you wouldn't normally find outside a gastropub. The coffee is the real deal and a chef plates up in front of you at the appropriately named "live theatre." It's all very Hell's Kitchen. So whether you're feasting your eyes on the view of St Pauls in London or are rubbing shoulders with the stars of Emmerdale in Yorkshire, lunch here can get pretty exciting.

In terms of actual food though, nothing compares to what the cast and crew of I'm A Celebrity... Get Me Out Of Here get through. In previous series, they've demolished 3,000 eggs, 400kg of potatoes, 300kg of steak and 100kg of ice cream. Plus the odd kangaroo testicle.

5

Bet you definitely didn't know

We produce a lot of award-winning, ratings-grabbing shows from serious drama to comedy and entertainment. You'll know Vera or Marchlands and I'm A Celebrity... but we bet you didn't know that we also make Channel 4's Come Dine With Me or Living's Four Weddings.

6

We're in love with the beautiful game

During the 2010 World Cup more people watched the England v Algeria game on ITV than on any other channel. Up until 2011's Royal Wedding, it was the most watched TV moment in over five years.

7

What does it really take to be number one?

490 chocolate bars, apparently.

In 2010 the X Factor final was the most watched programme in the UK - more than half of you tuned in to see Matt Cardle win. Behind the scenes though, it's thirsty work, with 14,980 bottles of water drunk over the audition tour and Bootcamp alone.

Apparently it works up a bit of an appetite too. 38 trolley loads of snacks were consumed by the judges and crew before we even got to the live shows. Including 490 chocolate bars eaten by the judges. The question is, who ate the most?

8

Brave new world

More and more people are watching TV online - and they're doing it at ITV. ITV2 and ITV3 are the UK's most-watched digital channels.

In fact, 2010's most successful new drama, Downton Abbey, broke new boundaries when it came to online viewing, becoming our most-watched catch up episode ever. Well, so far.

9

It's a small world

We don't just make shows for the UK, you know. We've got production bases in seven countries. And of the 35,000 hours of programming we produce, we share 3,000-odd titles with the rest of the world, distributing shows and films to thousands of broadcasters in more than 240 territories.

It means Jeremy Kyle can tell people what's what in the US and 28 countries can now experience Come Dine With Me contestants' weekly battle to become hostess with the mostest.

10