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Roles at ITV Studios.

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It takes many professional disciplines to produce a TV programme - from the creative minds that come up with and deliver the idea, to the technical, craft and production management teams who design the look, oversee a complex array of logistics and make it all happen. There’s a rewarding career for all skills and aptitudes - make up artists, designers, producers, camera operators, directors, technical assistants, production coordinators and accountants.  Some on a permanent basis but many as freelancers.  

ITV is for everyone - scroll down to read some profiles of people already working here, what they do day to day and how they started their careers.

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    VT Editor

    Meet Philippa - VT Editor

    How did you get into TV and your role of Editor at ITV Daytime?

    I started my career in Dublin, Ireland, working as a runner for the evening news.

    When there was downtime, I would hang around the editors and watch what they were doing. I hung around long enough that they started giving me some small bits of work. From there I began to freelance edit on the evening news and then I got a fulltime job as an editor on the station's Weekend Breakfast Show where I worked for 2 years.

    I then applied for my current role at ITV Daytime on a whim. I didn't think I would even get an interview.

    3 years later, here I am! I am a part of an incredible team who work around the clock editing everything from breaking news to fashion and features for Good Morning Britain, Lorraine, This Morning and Loose Women.

    Your insight into a typical day

    As an editor there really is no such thing as a typical day. Every day brings something new and a different challenge. Most days, I work with a producer from one of the daytime shows to edit the piece they are working on. This is different every day, which is something I love about my job.

    What are the key skills needed for your role?

    For me, communication skills are the most important part of my job. Editing skills are essential but being able to understand what a producer wants, and the vision they have is vital in getting the best results.

    What do you most like about your job?

    I love the creativity and freedom I have to create something new every day. I'm continually learning new things. I also love that my role allows me to work with so many different people. I have made some great friends across all the different teams at ITV.

    Can you give some tips for anyone wishing to get into the industry and to do your role?

    Always ask.

    People in the TV industry are some of the best people I've come across and are always happy to help. It's not an easy industry to get into. Most of us have experienced that and are more than happy to give advice and help out when we can.

    What are your future ambitions/where does this role typically lead career-wise?

    Thankfully being part of the Daytime Edit Team means I've had some great opportunities to work across amazing projects. Last year I was involved with the production of Piers Morgan's interview with President Trump. There are always exciting projects coming along that my team can get involved with.

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    Runner

    Meet Stefan - Runner

    How did you get into TV?

    In my final year of university, I spent a lot of time applying for different schemes and placements within the industry for when I graduated. Despite not studying television production, I knew that a career within the industry would be my dream career, but previously never knew how I could get involved. I was lucky enough to achieve a place on the ITV Insight Scheme and gain access into the work experience talent pool, which led to my two weeks placement on Love Island Aftersun. This was my first experience in the world of professional television production and I knew that the environment was the one for me.

    How did you get your role of Runner at ITV?

    As soon as I completed my work experience placement, I did some work as a Day Runner on In For A Penny. This was my first experience working on location within television and I absolutely loved it! Soon after this, I joined the team full time for the remainder of the series and, as the series came to a close, joined the team on Ant and Dec's Saturday Night Takeaway. For me, it all happened so quickly, but I wouldn't change a thing about it!

    Your insight into a typical day?

    No day is ever the same! Whilst working within the office, I work closely with the rest of the production team and assist them with whatever tasks they need an extra hand with, whilst also working with the editorial team in helping them in anything they may need an extra pair of eyes on. Ultimately, as a Production Runner, you're shared amongst all aspects of the team in the lead up to the show, including working on VTs and preparation for studio. Whilst on location or in the studio, a typical day will normally start very early and end very late, but the end result is second to none! I do lots of running around, I make a lot of tea and coffee, and constantly deliver messages between different members of the team, but every single second is so rewarding.

    What are the key skills needed for your role?

    It's always vital to think outside of the box when being a runner in the television industry. You never know what errand you're going to be asked to run, what prop you're going to be asked to source or what kind of person you're going to be asked to find - it's really important to be brave and confident and trust your instincts! It's also really important to be happy speaking to people you've never met, whether this be meeting other individuals within the industry or a stranger on the street asking where the nearest hardware store is!

    What do you most like about your job?

    I love that every single day is completely different. You get to meet a whole new circle of people and ultimately you're working in an industry that everyone knows a bit about. Working on programmes that I've watched growing up is such an amazing experience, and being able to watch back your hard work is a feeling that you don't get in any other industry! I also love working in a creative environment, knowing that the end result is something that so many people will take joy from.

    Can you give some tips for anyone wishing to get into the industry and to do your role?

    It's really important to stay determined and not be disheartened by initial setbacks when starting out in the industry. I'd say a great knowledge of TV itself will always be beneficial, so it's really important to love not only the type of television you want to make, but be aware of other genres that you haven't necessarily looked into before. It's also great to research the industry and look at which production companies make what programmes, as you'll definitely be amazed at the amount of television that's made by different companies. Always remember that you're bound to make mistakes in the early days embarking on a career like this, and the entire process of being a runner is about learning!

    What are your future ambitions/where does this role typically lead career-wise?

    The TV industry has so many different pathways and sectors within it, and right now starting out in the industry I'm still exploring all the different opportunities available. I'd love to get involved in some casting and games development experience in the near future, but right now I'm just enjoying gaining as much experience as possible amongst a variety of different television genres!

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    Researcher

    Meet Charlotte - Researcher

    How did you get into TV?

    I began my TV career doing work experience for ITV on shows such as Saturday Night Takeaway, Love Island, and Loose Women. The experience I gained working on such well- known shows with extremely talented teams proved invaluable when applying for jobs on other TV shows.

    How did you get your role of Researcher at ITV?

    My time as work experience at ITV really kickstarted my career in TV. I was able to meet a variety of different people across the editorial and production teams who would put me forward for other TV work, where I would then meet more people, which would lead onto another TV job and so forth.

    Thanks to my time as work experience on Love Island, I was asked to return to the team as their casting runner. I was lucky enough to be asked back the following series as a casting researcher for the show and have been a researcher ever since.

    Your insight into a typical day...

    No day is the same in TV! As a researcher I have been fortunate enough to have worked across casting, edit, studio, locations, and gallery. Exploring all of the different roles at this level is such a great way to find out what you enjoy the most, and what you think you would like to focus on further down the line in your career. Some days I might be running around like a headless chicken on location looking for some last-minute props for a scene, other days I am chatting to new people morning till night to try and cast them for a particular show. It really does differ depending on what your researcher role is, and what show you are working on.

    What are the key skills needed for your role?

    Being able to work well as part of a team is super important in the world of telly, as is having good communication skills. You are constantly meeting new people and being able to work well with them is one of the keys to making a successful show.

    Because TV is such a fast-paced and ever-changing environment, being able to work under pressure and having good problem-solving skills is essential. You have to be able to think on your feet and use your initiative as much as possible.

    What do you most like about your job?

    Working in TV isn’t a 9-5 desk job. It is full of surprises and you never know what it will bring. I have never ever said ‘I’m bored’ at work before. It is fun and exciting; and the sense of camaraderie within your team is second to none. You really do become like a family!

    Can you give some tips for anyone wishing to get into the industry and to do your role?

    I am a huge advocate for work experience, I wouldn’t be where I am in TV without it. The best thing you can do is be yourself, be personable, and be willing! People take note when you think outside of the box and go the extra mile for the tasks you are given, no matter how menial they may seem.

    What are your future ambitions/where does this role typically lead career-wise?

    Working in editorial as a researcher, the natural path of progression for me would be to move up to assistant producer, and then to producer, series producer, and then executive producer. The beauty of TV is that there are so many different paths you can take. If you don’t particularly enjoy working within one realm of TV, there is a plethora of other opportunities to explore that will most likely be right up your street.

    Working in TV isn’t a 9-5 desk job. It is full of surprises and you never know what it will bring. I have never ever said ‘I’m bored’ at work before. It is fun and exciting; and the sense of camaraderie within your team is second to none. You really do become like a family!

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    Script Editor

    Meet James - Script Editor

    How did you get into TV and your role?

    I worked in Finance in Canary Wharf and then became a runner on Big Brother and worked my way up on various shows. I then got a role as an archivist which enabled me to get into the Soaps. 

    Your insight into a typical day?

    My role is to assist the Producers and Senior Script Editors. A typical day involves catching up on reading and answering queries from Script Supervisors, Archive and Story teams. We also check if anything has been missed in the storyline. For example, if someone has a new job, have we been consistent throughout. 

    What are the key skills needed for your role?

    Communication. Being a team player is important, not just with your own team, but with Production, the story team and the research team. You must be versatile. You also need a keen eye for detail and have a good understanding of the stories. You can’t force a storytelling ability, storytelling comes from having lots of varied experiences and a varied background. I’ve lived on a farm growing up, worked as a banker, fired people etc. These experiences help.

    What do you most like about your job?

    The versatility of the role. Also, it’s about telling those stories and finding the heart in those stories. 

    Life experience enables you to find common ground with someone and you can then draw from your own experiences and implement them into scripts. 

    Can you give some tips for anyone wishing to get into the industry and to do your role?

    You’ve got to love Soaps! Soaps are different from other dramas as they’re on 6 times a week so you have to be able to rotate those stories. You have to love telling stories and understand why it's important to tell stories. Having a passion for stories and soaps is important and you should look at the characters and their individuality. 

    What are your future ambitions/where does this role typically lead career-wise?

    I currently do a mixture of both Assistant Script Editing and Script Editing. I’d like to become a Script Editor. People tend to go down either the storylining or the writing route. I want to become a writer one  day and eventually have my own production company.

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    Storyliner

    Meet Marco - Storyliner

    How did you get into TV and your role?

    First got into TV by applying for a work placement with BBC and did a 2-week work placement on Watchdog. From there started jumping from show to show and genre to genre, gaining a range of experience. I eventually got into continuing drama by working on Hollyoaks and familiarised myself with genre there. This experience then enabled me to work at Emmerdale. Found the job on itv website so applied. There was an assessment day and I was a bit apprehensive about it as I know they can be challenging. I was a bit nervous but you just have to be confident and be yourself. It took me three times to get there. 

    Your insight into a typical day?

    Every day is completely different. Once we’ve had our short term conference, the team takes a storyline each and write up a story. We then outline it, scene-by-scene, episode-by-episode. Our typical day involves writing these storylines and beats to compose a storyline document. This will be sent to the Script Writers with a month-worth of episodes to give them a good idea of what stories will be told. I speak to the story team, researchers, archivists and producers on a regular basis.

    What are the key skills needed for your role?

    Creativity as it’s a very creative role. You have to be able to come up with ideas and pitch those ideas. You will also need confidence as you will have to pitch those ideas to a writing team and producers. So being able to confidently pitch your ideas is important. With that, comes a lot of debate and people disagreeing with each other so you’ve got to be able to debate. You will also need a sound knowledge of the genre- so know what soaps and continuing dramas are like. You’ll also need a good knowledge of Emmerdale itself. You must have a strong understanding of character, story and structure and strong writing skills with the ability to adapt to house-styles.

    What do you most like about your job?

    Ability to use my creativity and get the creative juices flowing. I’ve not been here long enough yet, but pitching and writing an idea and seeing  it in the different stages will be great. Then seeing it on screen for millions of people to watch is one of the most rewarding things. Also, I love the collaborative story-telling dynamic as it’s a team effort- it’s nice to hear those different voices. 

    Can you give some tips for anyone wishing to get into the industry and to do your role?

    Get as much experience as you can, no matter what show or genre. I started on factual and moved to News, then BBC sport. I got most of my experience through entertainment and reality. I’ve always wanted to go into Continuing drama, but even working in Entertainment I was able to develop my skill set to help me move to Emmerdale. Also, contact people and link up with people. It’s great to keep contact with people you’ve met in jobs and build as many contacts as possible. 

    What are your future ambitions/where does this role typically lead career-wise?

    Most people go on to be writers or producers like a series or story producer. Personally I would like to be a writer, although that could change. Hopefully this role will finesse my skills. Equally, I would be happy to go down the producer road too.

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    3rd Assistant Director

    Meet Kayleigh, 3rd Assistant Director

    How did you get into TV and your role?

    I went a different route into TV. I always knew that I wanted to work in TV but no-one's really aware of the roles when you’re growing up. I always knew that I wanted to work in drama but I wasn't quite sure what part. I loved drama so I went to all drama clubs. I went to uni and did  Performance and Professional Practice and then I decided that I’d be a drama teacher at a secondary school but I hated it. I knew I wanted to do something with drama. It was always TV I wanted to do but I got a job in radio doing promotions which was the closest thing I could do to TV.  I loved it but still knew I wanted a job in TV. I then went and did a degree in broadcast journalism and from there I just saw an advert on someone's Facebook page; a runner had dropped out of a Volkswagen Commercial. I messaged the person and took a holiday from radio and worked really hard. I got a contact at BBC and started to work my way up. I was at the BBC for 4 years and started off as a runner. I knew I wanted to go down the AD route and worked really hard to get a 3rd AD role. I went onto different productions and worked my way up. Started on Doctors and then went on to period drama Father Brown and then Shakespeare and Hathaway. I did some films in between and adverts.

    Your insight into a typical day?

    A typical day in the life of a 3rd AD is you get to studio or location just before first call, which is 7am at Emmerdale. You help the 1st and 2nd AD and make sure you know what's going on throughout the day. You’ll mark up the call sheet and make sure that everyone is where they’re meant to be. You’re overseeing everything. Once everyone is called onto set, you can be travelling artists to set, doing queues, making sure the cast and crew are happy and know what they’re doing. You’re ultimately there to do everything you can to help the 1st and 2nd ADs. It gets really busy and hectic, but it’s so good. Every day is so, so different. It’s really hard to sum up your day. There isn’t a day-to-day structure of the day. Every department is like a cog and you’re making sure all those cogs turn together. You have to be liaising and communicating with every department.

    What are the key skills needed for your role?

    You definitely have to be organised because you need to know what's happening and when. You’ve got to be committed- it’s really long, hard days and you have to be really focused. You have to be able to think ahead. Sometimes you have to think 10 steps ahead. You have to be adaptable as things can change at the flick of a switch. You need to be approachable and friendly as you have to speak to so many people and liaise with all the different departments. They need to be able to talk to you and come to you if there’s an issue. Keeping a cool head is important- you have to hold it together. Be a great communicator,  you need to be able to get your point across and be diplomatic. You’re trying to make all departments work together and sometimes they don’t agree so you become the voice of reason. You need thick skin as it's a tough industry- you work long, hard days.

    What do you most like about your job?

    I love it so much. It’s challenging and every single day is so, so different. You never get two days the same. Emmerdale, every day is different, but also every job is so different. You get faced with different challenges every day. Some days are more fun than others. You don’t know what your day is going to be like. You build relationships with people and become a family. You are a real family on set and it’s lovely to have them.

    Can you give some tips for anyone wishing to get into the industry and to do your role?

    It's really hard. It can be quite disheartening. When you come out of Uni and you have to start at entry level and you feel like you’re just making cups of teaUse those jobs as opportunities to network. Make those cups of tea the best cups of tea you’ve ever made. Directors remember the cup of tea. Never feel disheartened. You just have to work hard and work your way up. That is part of the industry. Be a sponge and soak up what everyone is doing around you. What do you learn from the 1st and 2nd and 3rd. Learn from so many different people. Take the best of people. You’re only as good as your last job. Keep smiling as much as you can. Even if you feel disheartened, work as hard as you can and never feel deflated or disheartened.

    What are your future ambitions/where does this role typically lead career-wise?

    I want to be a 1st AD and that’s my aim. The AD route is 3rd, 2nd and 1st. I want to be a 1st AD. You become an AD and you get to see all the different departments. It opens your eyes. It also depends on job opportunities.

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    Gallery PA

    Meet Kylee - Gallery PA

    How did you get into TV and your role of Head of PA and Autocue?

    I saw an advert in the local newspaper for a Production Assistant to work at Meridian on local news. I was temping at the time and happened to be working with a relation to one of the Directors at Meridian so it was pure luck that I already had a good reference! From ITV Meridian I then moved to Sky to work on Channel 5 news for a couple of years where I made some strong working relationships. Through the contacts I had made at Channel 5, I was then made aware of a position on the Lorraine show at ITV so I applied and was successful. I have been working at ITV for 10 years this year with experience of working on all the daytime shows. I applied for Head of PA's and Autocue a couple of years ago as I wanted to take on more responsibility and gain experience in the managerial world.  

    Your insight into a typical day...

    A typical day will consist of working on one of the four daytime shows, working in the gallery on timings and playing out graphics live on-air. I would also complete some post show paperwork logging music and footage used within the shows. As I manage a team I can also be answering various questions and queries from my colleagues, organising rotas and planning ahead for any big shows coming up in the future.

    What are the key skills needed for your role?

    You have to be able to work under extreme pressure in a calm and professional manner, often problem solving with little time to spare. Communication and working in a team are key attributes needed as well as being extremely organised and having the ability to multitask. I think you also have to be prepared to travel and relocate to wherever the work is.

    What do you most like about your job?

    I love working on the live shows in a gallery environment. It's good fun and keeps you on your toes. The variety of working on all four daytime shows is a real luxury as they all present a slightly different way of working.

    Can you give some tips for anyone wishing to get into the industry and to do your role?

    I think the best advice to give somebody would be to gain as much experience as you can whether that's watching live shows go out or volunteering in some capacity.  Being in the TV environment would give somebody a real insight into the job roles available. Working in local news is a great way to learn how TV works and would give you the opportunity to build your confidence in the industry.

    What are your future ambitions/where does this role typically lead career-wise

    I feel that once you are working in the TV industry, opportunities are endless. You can shadow other roles and gain knowledge and experience in all specialities of the live shows including the production process behind the scenes.

    For myself I still enjoy learning the role of managing a team alongside my passion for working on the live shows but who knows what's round the corner, and what other opportunities may arise in the future.

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    Production Secretary

    Meet Darrell - Production Secretary

    How did you get into TV and your role?

    I am a Production Secretary at Emmerdale. I was meant to start in March, but I started in May 2020.  I did a BA in Film Production at  the University of the Creatives Arts and it gave me a basic understanding of the roles in a production team. During my final year on the course I specialised in cinematography and upon graduating in 2013 I worked as a camera assistant/runner on a few productions. 

    Once I got into the industry, I didn’t have the same passion for cinematography. In 2014 I got the opportunity to be a Film and TV assistant at secondary school, teaching students and staff about using cameras and editing. Whilst there I was in charge coordinating a student run news channel. This gave me a glimpse into what working in Production Management could be like.

    I decided to apply for a Masters but specialised in Production at the Screen Academy Scotland in Edinburgh. Throughout the whole year, I produced 6 short films, during that time I learnt how to operate budgets, create call sheets and manage a production schedule. 

    After graduating I got my first TV production role at Icon Films working as Production Department Assistant. Working as a PDA taught me how to manage diaries, and coordinating between different department great organisations and management skills. A Junior Production Coordinator position came up in a Natural Geographic series. That was my first experience as a production coordinator. I then worked in a smaller production company, where there was only 6 in the office, and I was given much more responsibility. Eventually, I wanted a change and I was sent the Emmerdale role by a friend. I then applied through the ITV jobsite and was successful. 

    Your insight into a typical day?

    Since Covid-19, I have been catching up on all the new practices. I’m currently working from home and I’ve been coordinating cast travel, organising their travel from locations and communicating their where-abouts with the ADs. I have also used this time to get trained on ITV’s systems and practices. I am currently being trained on how to put together call sheets. Another part of my duties is ensuring that teams have enough hand sanitiser and hand wipes so I have been managing the stock and distributing them. On a typical day, you will need to respond to different ad hoc requests from cast and crew too. 

    What are the key skills needed for your role?

    Attention to detail is important as you have to get content out to 300 people under time pressure. There are always changes or mistakes so you have to keep up. Days can be challenging so you have to be resilient. You also have to ask for help when you need it and communicate well with other team members. Adaptability and flexibility is important as sometimes you have to change what you’re doing depending on what is top priority. You must remain calm under pressure and keep a level head so you can process information properly. If you are struggling, always mention it to someone. Also, always try to be polite as you never know what other people are going through. 

    What do you most like about your job?

    How welcoming and friendly everyone is! I started my role at a difficult time, but everyone was really accommodating and understanding. There’s a lot of variation in the role and you have to rise to the challenge. I love to try different things and there’s always a different challenge every day. I feel like I'm a vital member of the team already and I like the level of responsibility I get given. 

    Can you give some tips for anyone wishing to get into the industry and to do your role?

    Always try and network and get as much work experience as you can. You never know who you will meet and what opportunities will come from it. Get as much experience as you can, whether its in films, commercials, TV.  It’s also important to have work experience outside of the TV industry- I worked in a bar and hospitality and it gave me such great, transferable skills. Try to get some technical skills too, like working with excel and word. Learning formulas for budgets is useful for this role. Research the role and learn what experience and skills you need. Try and organise as many things as you can as this job is all about organising. Even if you’re on a sports team, try and get in an organisational position as it will put you in good stead. 

    What are your future ambitions/where does this role typically lead career-wise?

    I’d like to be head of production or senior production manager one day. When I did my MA I wanted to be a PA and move into a junior production role and work my way up the ladder. The next step for me would be production coordinator. I think the best way is to work your way up in a linear manner. But it completely depends on your personal ambitions as I know people in production who go on to work as directors.

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    Production Co-ordinator

    Meet Tayler, Production Co-ordinator

    How did you get into TV and your role of production coordinator?

    I joined ITV as an ITV apprentice in 2015 within the Procurement department. I completed my apprenticeship alongside day running on weekends at ITV, as well as weekend work at Global Radio for Heart and Capital FM. Working in a department spanning all areas of the business, and production, gave me a real insight and understanding of the company, the way we operate and what would suit me. I worked with the Events team as part of my apprenticeship with Procurement, after 10 months in my apprenticeship I moved onto a role as a Project Administrator in ITV Events, which I worked in for a year.

    Having kept good contacts within ITV Daytime during my time as an apprentice, the transition from Events to Production was pretty seamless when a role as a Production Secretary came up at This Morning, the two areas within the ITV run very similarly and the skills needed were easily transferable.

    Your insight into a typical day...

    As always, it varies on each show I do, as everyone operates differently. Generally speaking I produce call sheets and risk assessments for upcoming shoots, manage runner/logger workloads and tasks, arrange and hire kit from our suppliers, liaise with external suppliers for shoots, and work with the edit team to make sure they have the rushes in the edit ready to cut. I work very closely with my Production Manager to make sure our expenditure is in line with our expectations, and foresee any possible issues, making savings where possible.

    What are the key skills needed for your role?

    Goes without saying, but being organised is one of the most important skills! Being able to prioritise tasks, manage time effectively and manage expectations goes a long way in such a fast paced environment. For me, being able to work with different personalities well is vital. 

    ITV is a melting pot of the best people in the business, from our editorial, tech and production teams, being able to get along with everyone makes working on sometimes challenging shoots seamless and all the more worthwhile.

    What do you most like about your job?

    I love the variety of working across such a broad range of shows from large entertainment shows such as Love Island, I’m a Celeb & Dancing on Ice, to factual documentaries about News or Consumer Affairs. No two shows are the same, and no two series of any show are the same. You work with different teams each time, getting to work alongside so many different people is very refreshing. The buzz of seeing a show I’ve worked on go out on air never goes away!

    Can you give some tips for anyone wishing to get into the industry and to do your role?

    Having a great attitude is vital - you can be taught pretty much anything, but you can’t be taught a personality! Being able to work well within a team, being approachable and proactive for me is more important than experience. Being adaptable, open to learning and doing things you wouldn’t necessarily have considered before, or working in a new way, will equip you going forward and you’ll be grateful for the challenge!

    What are your future ambitions/where does this role typically lead career-wise?

    Within Production, the general progression is Secretary - Coordinator - Junior Production Manager - Production Manager - Line Producer - & so on. I always try and get as much variety as I can with the shows I go onto, a mix of doing shows I absolutely adore, to shows that I wouldn’t have considered before that might teach me new ways of working and new skills going forward. Only by gaining experience do I have a clearer understanding of the genres and types of shows that best suit me and what I enjoy working on the most, and whilst I remain as Production Coordinator I want to continue this and steer towards areas within ITV I feel I work best, before stepping up.

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    Production Accountant

    Meet Diya, Production Accountant

    How did you get into TV and your role of Production Accountant? 

    After university I wasn't entirely sure what I wanted to go into, so decided to take a gap year and work abroad where my first job was as an accounts assistant for Channel 7. Since then I've worked in both Management Accounts and Production Accounting for media companies but soon realised I enjoyed working in Production Finance more.

    Your insight into a typical day...

    Working closely with the finance and production teams to ensure we are keeping in line with the production budget, accuracy of cost reports and financial planning to determine whether there are any over/under spends.

    What are the key skills needed for your role? 

    Being able to communicate financial information to non- finance staff and good attention to detail, especially when reconciling costbooks.

    What do you most like about your job?

    Being able to combine my numerical background with my love for TV and having the opportunity to work with both finance and production teams.

    Can you give some tips for anyone wishing to get into the industry and to do your role? 

    Understanding the sections that make up a programme budget will be a great advantage to anyone coming into this role. Being familiar with the vocabulary used in the industry will also be an added bonus.

    What are your future ambitions/where does this role typically lead career-wise. 

    An experience of Production Accounting can lead to various opportunities if you wish to broaden your horizons. It is common for Qualified Production Accountants within ITV to move into Financial Analyst or Head of Finance roles. This is because they have a solid understanding of both production and the finance systems. For me, I would be keen to progress into a business partnering/manager role.

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    Electrician

    Meet George & Ethan - Electricians

    How did you get into TV and your roles?

    George - I got into ITV through signing up to a training provider JTL, which specialises in electrical business. I saw the Job advertised through JTL and applied through ITV site. I got an interview for the apprenticeship and ultimately got the role. I was meant to finish the apprenticeship in September but due to CoronaVirus I haven’t finished yet. 

    Ethan - I got into ITV the exact same way, by applying to the apprenticeship. 

    Your insight into a typical day?

    George - There’s a lot of maintenance involved in the role. During filming days you start at 8am and work out what scenes you have and check if the Lighting Director wants anything changing or any lights adding. As the lighting Director sits in the gallery he will radio over if he needs anything changing or moving. Day-to-day the job is very varied and you will talk to a variety of different departments. We talk to the props department if they need lights moving or if we need props moving. We also talk to the camera department in case lighting or lighting equipment needs moving for a camera. 

    Ethan - My duties vary every day. This morning I was setting up and rigging a court room. Typically you do your studio checks- check if we have enough gels, tapes etc. and make sure all departments know where everything is. Every day is different, it ranges from PAT testing to fixing lights and cables. 

    What are the key skills needed for your role?

    George - You need to be willing to learn. You always need to be enthusiastic and willing to learn new things from lots of different people.

    Ethan - You need to be sociable as it’s a job where you talk to lots of different departments. You also need to be good with your hands and at fixing things like plug or lights. 

    What do you most like about your job?

    George - I like that I will be getting a qualification at the end of my contract. It’s great to be earning money and a qualification at the same time. I also love the variety of the role- one day you’ll be in studio, the next you’ll be on Location somewhere in Manchester.  

    Ethan - I love interacting with different people every day. The role varies so much and you will often be doing different jobs every day so you’re always kept on your toes.  

    Can you give some tips for anyone wishing to get into the industry and to do your role?

    George - I’d advise always keeping an eye on the careers website and looking at new jobs or opportunities that come up. Think about the job you want to apply for and what skills are needed and prepare for your interview with that in mind. It’s always important to know your industry so research how the role works. 

    Ethan - Make sure you watch Corrie! 

    What are your future ambitions/where does this role typically lead career-wise?

    George - I’d like to become a gaffer or eventually a Lighting Director too. I do a bit of console operating and know the basics and am quite interested in that. A couple of the electricians in the past have gone into the camera department. On our first week in the apprenticeship we got to visit all the different departments which was really interesting. I’d definitely like to earn my apprenticeship qualification first and learn my trade first.

    Ethan - I want to finish my apprenticeship and get fully qualified. I’d like to work my way to become a gaffer or eventually a Lighting Director. Lighting Director is the top of the lighting career-route. 

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    Graphic Designer

    Meet Munira - Graphic Designer

    How did you get into TV and your role of Graphic Designer?

    I went to university to study Graphic design, from there I went on to work in design studios but after a while felt I needed to broaden my skills and have some animation skills added to my portfolio so went to National film and television school to study in depth animation and title sequence design for film and TV. And from there I got the specific skills and knowledge that enabled me to work in ITV.

    Your insight into a typical day...

    It's different every week, depending on what shift I'm on I could be doing design work for busy fast paced news output which require me to do infographics based graphics, media walls, maps, news stories stat reveals or I could be on projects working on a strand for a new trendy upcoming fashion show which consists of designing a sting, wipe and all the assets needed for it. The usual process within every shift is to get the brief from producers via email, discuss with the lead designer for that day and design it using After Effects and the rest of the Adobe suite. Once that's done it is sent for approval to the producer and then sent to the correct output either live or edit.

    What are the key skills needed for your role?

    Key skills in a fast paced live TV environment it's to be organised and have time management skills, as well as the essential technical skills of knowing how to use the design softwares especially After Effects as we use it everyday to create our animations. You also need to be creative with a strong eye for design and know how to be creative while respecting brand identity and look. In addition to being passionate, patient and calm as it's fast paced with tight deadlines when on live broadcast and most of the times you need to design on the fly or make some last minute close to transmission time changes. So you also need to be a great communicator as you're always actively communicating with live operators, producers, directors, reporters, library etc.

    What do you most like about your job?

    I like the creativity side of it as when on projects shift you have the freedom to research, and come up with cool ideas so it's not really just daily broadcast work but also makes me feel like back when I used to do design work with more flexible deadlines. I also like the fact that every week I'm doing something different and on a different shift. So if I'm working on Good Morning Britain for one week, the following week I'd be on something else like doing a cookery strand and so on.

    Can you give some tips for anyone wishing to get into the industry and to do your role?

    Equip yourself with the necessary skills, make sure you're passionate about it. And get into a Broadcast related course or animation, make sure you understand how it works because it's different from for example print design which was mainly my area before getting into TV.

    What are your future ambitions/where does this role typically lead career-wise?

    My future ambitions is to develop with the department, since I've joined I moved up from Junior designer to Middleweight designer thanks to my supportive managers and team who are always helpful through talking performance 1-to-1 meetings which help you see your strengths and weaknesses and areas for improvement.

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    Make-up Artist

    Meet Poppy - Make-up Artist

    How did you get into TV and your role?

    I moved to Manchester for Uni to study Fashion Media Makeup Artistry and then I got a job in MAC at Selfridges.  One of my modules required me to find work experience.  I did 2 days work experience at ITV shadowing the makeup department.  Whilst doing work experience, I heard there was a freelance makeup runner opportunity coming up on a new ITV show that required you to take contributors from Makeup to Studio.  I sent over my CV and was successful for the role.

    Whilst working as a freelance makeup runner I got my hairdressing qualification.  I then secured 2 weeks of work experience on a big Corrie storyline that included doing the makeup for a burns victim.  A trainee job then came up on the ITV careers site - I applied and was successful.  There was a trainee job advertised the previous year so I had been preparing my skills and experience and waiting for another opportunity to come up.

    Your insight into a typical day?

    My average day starts at 7am where you set up your makeup place for whoever you have in the chair. We have all our continuity on an ipad and you need to make sure you know what the artists are doing eg, going to work/going to The Rovers and do their makeup in correlation to this. You then go into the studio or on the street with the artist if you don’t have anyone else’s makeup to do. You must be on top of their hair and makeup continuity throughout and you might have to watch multiple people in one day. 

    Our typical day has changed after the effects of Covid- we now leave a makeup bag for them to do their own makeup and hair. When looking for continuity issues, we must then describe to the artist which makeup/hair needs moving or changing.

    What are the key skills needed for your role?

    You need good people skills. At Corrie, it’s different from normal drama settings as there’s 6 Makeup Supervisors and all supervisors like you to do different things, so you need to be able to adapt well to who you are working with as this changes daily. You need to be ambitious as things don’t get handed to you. You are always learning and can always learn from someone else. You should also be proactive and look to help out wherever you can.

    What do you most like about your job?

    I love that every day is different. At Corrie, there are so many storylines and there’s always something new to learn. You can’t learn everything at uni/college - some things you have to learn on the job. I worked on David Platt and Anna’s storyline when Anna’s legs were burnt so I had to learn how to do burns. I also got to learn how to do gunshot wounds with the Pat Phelan storylines. There’s always something new to learn.

    Can you give some tips for anyone wishing to get into the industry and to do your role?

    I would recommend getting as much work experience as possible. You never know who you’ll meet. Email the designers of programmes that you enjoy and say the specific things that you loved about the makeup and hair. Use LinkedIn- it’s a great way to find people and jobs in the industry and always stay professional when you’re reaching out.

    What are your future ambitions/where does this role typically lead career-wise?

    I started as a trainee and have now progressed to become a makeup assistant. The next step is senior assistant and then Supervisor. Another ambition would be to get more drama experience or film experience, but I can’t see myself leaving Corrie! Corrie has been great and let me go on sabbaticals- last year I worked on BBC’s Years and Years and the year before spent three weeks on Phantom Thread with Daniel Day Lewis. It’s great because I can bring new skills I’ve learned back to Corrie.

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    Engineer

    Meet Neave - Engineer

    How did you get into TV and your role?

    I went to the Uni of York to study Film and TV Production but had no prior knowledge of TV. I fell in love with TV after our first practical. I joined the student radio station and became the assistant chief engineer in my first term of University and then was promoted to Chief Engineer by the end of the first year. Working on the student radio station gave me an interest in broadcast technology. Once I got the role as Chief Engineer at my uni radio station, I then knew I wanted to go into the engineering side of TV so I got as much experience as I could. I spent the summer working for CTV on the cricket as a runner and worked in other jobs as much as I could. I graduated and got some freelance work for Global radio and ITN. I then applied for the support engineer position at Coronation street and was successful. 

    Your insight into a typical day...

    There are a few strands to what we do in the engineering department and a typical day depends on what the production is doing each day. You might be working as a Vision Engineer- checking everything is exposed correctly and the colour is correct. Or you might be on location rigging equipment and making sure anything that's broken gets fixed quickly. You might also be responsible for supporting the site and working to fix and problems or planning large upgrades. There is also the option to undertake small scale projects and come up with solutions to fix recurring problems. 

    What are the key skills needed for your role?

    The main part of being an engineer is being able to think creatively to solve problems. You also need to be able to work well in a team as you work with other engineers and shooting crew on a daily basis. You must be able to work well under pressure as sometimes a whole crew is waiting for you to fix a problem before they can start shooting. 

    What do you most like about your job?

    I like the challenges. At Corrie, you look after a large range of technology, not just cameras and sound. You look after vision systems and you need to know your way around other technologies. I’m always thinking about how to improve things and I love coming up with solutions when something goes wrong! 

    Can you give some tips for anyone wishing to get into the industry and to do your role?

    Get as much experience as possible. There’s lots of transferable skills/knowledge you can gain from working in theatres and volunteering at school or university. The opportunities give you experience fixing things and solving problems. There are lots of facebook groups that give great advice to entry level people and post job opportunities so I’d recommend joining those groups. Apply for as much as you can and if there’s a student TV or radio station join it. 

    What are your future ambitions/where does this role typically lead career-wise?

    You can either go into vision engineering and work for outside broadcasters and do sports. Or you can develop into a senior engineer or a technical manager and eventually head up as Head of Technology. I’d like to work towards the technical manager route as I love solving bigger logistical problems. 

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